An Invitation for Father’s Day

Manly Training will be hosting a Father’s Day Tribute that will knock your socks off! Set your calendars because for 45 days starting the day after Mother’s Day through Father’s Day we will be featuring Guests from all walks of life who will be writing a short piece in honor of the Role that men play as fathers. The series is called “My Father’s legacy“.

It doesn’t matter if you had a godly father or not, a father that was there for you or absent from your life. All of us can say that they left a legacy. Find out what top CEOs and business owners have to say about their dads. Take a peek into what A Pastor and a Bishop have to say about their father. These and many more will share with us a lesson they learned about being a dad.

If you would like to be a part of this celebration, contact me. There are still a few spots left. E-mail me at ejq3@att.net

The Joshua Project – Kingsley Armstrong –

Kingsley, Cathy, Jemima & Isaac Armstrong live in Northallerton, North Yorkshire in the UK.

They started their Joshua Project in 1995 and have since traveled extensively across the UK and to many nations throughout the world.

Cathy homeschools with the children which has made the family ‘portable’.

Please pray for them as they continue to lead people to inherit the land that God has for them. Feel free to contact them by cicking HERE, or through Facebook, “kingsley’n’cathy”, or by email ‘kingsley@thejoshuaproject.co.uk

A word from Kingsley:

Dear Friends:

Happy New Year and Welcome to 2016. You have never been here before. Facing you is a brand new Season that has not yet been trampled upon or spoiled, ready for new direction and anointing. We could collectively change the world this year! We hope that you had a great Christmas and managed to rest a little. I was spending some time in prayer over the holidays and thinking ahead, trying to see how I could even slow down a little in 2016 and adapt what I do to a more leisurely pace. However, right at the beginning of my time with the Lord, I had the stirring inside that I was wrong. This is not the time to settle, but the time to stretch out and run faster. I was thinking about Caleb’s daughter in Joshua 15:18&19. She was the daughter of the one who was so bold as to believe God to take the promised Land. He & Joshua stood against the rest of the people and said that they needed to walk by faith, that the Lord had already given them the land. He was the one who at 85 wanted to jog over the mountain. His daughter came to him and asked him to give her more land. This is the time to extend, to sharpen, to deepen, to see more and more happen in our ministries and lives. So, let’s get off our La-Z-Boys, turn off the TV, and get moving! May God bless you today…and make you a blessing wherever you go!!!!

Kingsley & Cathy

For more information on the Joshua Project click on this link:

http://www.thejoshuaproject.co.uk/

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© 2017 MANLY TRAINING

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25 things Pastor Matt Bell Learned from his dad

Dave BellMy father passed away in 2012. He was young and healthy. His death was sudden and totally unexpected. His absence left a huge hole in my life and our family.

My dad was not a perfect man. But he was great man and model of what a husband and father should look like: faithful husband of 33 years, father of 5 boys, pastor and mentor to many other men. Not a day goes without me wishing he was still here with us.

In honor of him, I want to share with you 25 things I learned from my father on how to be a husband, father and all around decent human being.

1. Follow Jesus.
If there was only one thing he could have taught his children, this would have been it.

2. Always tell the truth, even when it hurts.
Proverbs 12:19 – Truthful lips endure forever, but a lying tongue is but for a moment.

3. Your integrity is the most valuable thing you possess.
Proverbs 22:1 – A good name is to be chosen rather than great riches, and favor is better than silver or gold.

4. Finish what you start.
Luke 9:62 – Jesus said to him, “No one who puts his hand to the plow and looks back is fit for the kingdom of God.”

5. Be quick to repent and confess your sin.
James 5:16 – Therefore, confess your sins to one another and pray for one another, that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous person has great power as it is working.

6. When you’re done with something, put it away.
My dad hated messes. And with 5 boys in the house, there were plenty of opportunities for messes to appear. He taught us to clean up (take responsibility for) our own messes.
Proverbs 18:9 – Whoever is slack in his work is a brother to him who destroys.

7. Guard your heart.
Whenever I would fall into sin, my dad never condemned me for my actions. Instead he always asked me what was going on in my heart. Of course there was penalties for wrong behavior, but he always started by helping me examine my heart issues that lead to my actions.
Proverbs 4:2 – Keep your heart with all vigilance, for from it flow the springs of life.

8. Never be alone with a woman.
This was a non-negotiable rule in our house. Even into our twenties, my dad wouldn’t allow us to be alone with girls. To this day I hold this as a personal standard for myself.
1 Thessalonians 5:22 – Abstain from all appearance of evil.

9. Never hit a woman.
1 Peter 3:7 – Likewise, husbands, live with your wives in an understanding way, showing honor to the woman as the weaker vessel, since they are heirs with you of the grace of life, so that your prayers may not be hindered.

10. Be a one woman man. Marriage is for life.
Proverbs 6:32, 33 – He who commits adultery lacks sense; he who does it destroys himself. He will get wounds and dishonor, and his disgrace will not be wiped away.

11. Never talk back to your mom.
Matthew 15:4 For God commanded, ‘Honor your father and your mother,’

12. Don’t put people on a pedestal.

13. The Christian life is the only way to live.

14. You’re a champion.
1 John 5:4 – For everyone who has been born of God overcomes the world. And this is the victory that has overcome the world—our faith.

15. Your words have power. Speak life not death.
Proverbs 18:21 – Death and life are in the power of the tongue, and those who love it will eat its fruits.

16. Put God 1st.
Matthew 22:37 – Jesus replied: “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’

verseofthedaywide317. Next to your relationship with Jesus, your family is the highest priority.
I saw my dad model this on a daily basis.
1 Timothy 5:8 – But if anyone does not provide for his relatives, and especially for members of his household, he has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever.

18. He modeled unconditional love.

19. He modeled unconditional commitment.

20. Always included us in his life.
He would often include me and my brothers in whatever task he was doing. It was more important that we were with him, that the job getting done perfectly.
Proverbs 22:6 – Train up a child in the way he should go; even when he is old he will not depart from it.

21. It doesn’t matter what everyone else is doing. You do what’s right.

22. Responsibility is not something to run from, but should be embraced.

23. True riches aren’t found in money and possessions.
Luke 12:15 – And he said to them, “Take care, and be on your guard against all covetousness, for one’s life does not consist in the abundance of his possessions.”

24. The world is an evil place full of wicked men.
This might not sound like the most positive outlook. But my dad taught me to be on guard against those who would try and abuse and take advantage of me. As a father and husband, it’s now my God given calling to do that for my wife and children.
Jeremiah 17:9 – The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who can know it?

25. God is our perfect father who sent us his perfect son.
John 3:16, 17 – For God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish, but have eternal life. For God did not send the Son into the world to judge the world, but that the world might be saved through Him.

I know that I have been blessed beyond measure to have had Dave Bell as my father. Most of the things I learned from my dad were taken straight from God’s Word. By God’s grace, I hope to continue in the things I have been taught and impart God’s Word into the hearts of my own children.

Thanks for reading!

If you want to know more about Matt Bell, here are some links that will surely bless your socks off!

Pastor Matt Bell – FACEBOOK

Pastor Matt Bell – TWITTER

Destiny Church – TWITTER

Destiny Church – FACEBOOK

Destiny Church

Verse of the Day with Pastor Matt – Podcast

The book of ACTS

I would be very grateful if you shared  this article and website on your Twitter, Facebook, or other social media.

Here are some more good reads from Manly Training, and don’t forget that every day until Father’s Day manly training is publishing a new testimony from highly recognized authors, pastors and businessman on what they learned from their dads.

Some more good reads by Manly Training.

Working (and Eating) Like a Man – What Family Psychologist Chris Peters learned from his dad.

How Best to Raise a Daughter – What author Amalie Jahn learned from her dad.

What Author Chad Gramling learned from his dad

What Andy Specht learned from His Dad

What Author Tremayne Moore learned from His Dad

My Dad’s Life Lesson That Really Stuck With Me – Tyler Jacobson

What Kevin P Bradford learned from his dad. – Imitate Me!

Dad’s Sacrifices for Me – Robert P Holland

Fight the Good Fight – Whick D Turner

Time for Catch – Phil Conrad

The Sin of a Father – David Moore

What a father should be like…

BUILD CHARACTER INTO YOUR CHILDREN

ANGER VS. ANNOYANCE (as taught by dad)

What Family Psychologist Chris Peters learned from his dad.

Working (and Eating) Like a Man

Some of my most treasured memories growing up are from working with my dad. Though my dad was well-educated and hardworking, he had to work a lot of low-paying jobs to make ends meet. When I was old enough, I went to help him with his handyman gig on the weekends. We would load up his Ford pickup camper shell with the tools we would need for the day’s work, eat a quick breakfast and head out early in the morning. At first, I would just go fetch tools, hold the other end of a piece of wood while he cut it, and watch.

How Best to Raise a Daughter – What author Amalie Jahn learned from her dad.

How Best to Raise a Daughter
Amalie Jahn

2750675I can never walk into the lumber section of a big box hardware store without thinking of my dad, mainly because the aroma of aftershave and sawdust call to mind so many of my fondest childhood memories.
You see, upon hearing the news that his wife was expecting, my dad, (like most fathers, if they’re being honest) was thrilled by the prospect of raising a son. A man’s man, reared solely by his mother after his own father’s tragic death, he could only imagine how it would be to fish and boat and hunt with a son, because of course, that’s what he knew of childhood.
And then, as luck would have it, he was saddled with two daughters to raise instead.
This could be where the story ended – with my mother raising her daughters to be women while my father retreated to his man cave, unburdened. But happily, that is not what occurred. What happened instead is that my dad forgot all those traditional, gender-role stereotypes he grew up with, about what men should do and what women should do, and he just started teaching me everything he knew, despite my missing Y chromosome.
As soon as I was able to toddle down the basement stairs, he welcomed me into his domain – a world of platform trains and bumper pool and power tools. He hoisted me onto his lap and let me press the buttons, ushering the O-gauge Lionel trains in and out of their stations, around and around the track. He taught me the difference between straight and Phillips head screws, which grain sandpaper to use before staining, and why dovetail joints are stronger than mitered ones. He taught me how to hold a pool cue and aim the ball so it would ricochet directly into the pocket. And when my mother would call us upstairs for dinner, he’d join me in asking for “just five more minutes.”
Outside was another place where it didn’t matter that I was a girl. I’d watch for hours while he restored the small fleet of antique cars he kept1456257283 in the garage – the way he waxed the ebony paint until I could see my reflection in the body’s surface. On spring evenings, after dinner, while my mother washed the dishes, he would take me outside behind our garage and pitch softballs, one after another, while I tried to hit them with my undersized aluminum bat. He patiently coached me to choke up on the grip, keep my elbow up, and not crowd the plate. When summer arrived, I helped him till the potato patch, build our wooden swingset, and steer the lawnmower, perched on his lap. And when the oppressive heat of summer gave way to the crispness of fall, we went mountain biking together along the old railroad tracks, him always pushing my distance and pace while we talked endlessly about life’s big questions.
But then, in the blink of an eye, autumn blew into winter and I became a teenager, on the brink of adulthood. If there was a season in my life when my dad could have backed away, this would have been the time. Happily, though, even hormones and boyfriends couldn’t keep my dad from shaping the woman I was to become. He took me to the closest cemetery and taught 9781859me to parallel park. He showed me how to change my oil. He cheered from the stands at every one of my high school and college swim meets.
Eventually I left home and went out on my own, but thanks to my father’s ad hoc tutelage, I did so with the knowledge that I was capable of anything I set my heart on. I carried the lessons my dad taught me into my adulthood – about life without limits, about challenging what the world said I could and couldn’t do, and about going after my dreams. I am the woman I am today because my father didn’t set out to raise a girl. He set out to raise a person, the only way he knew how, and I’m so lucky that he did.

To find out more about Amalie Jahn

visit her website at amaliejahn.com

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© 2016 MANLY TRAINING

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What Author Chad Gramling learned from his dad

  • As a child, I believed my dad could fix any type of motor. Whether it was a lawn mower, dirt bike or automobile, my dad could fix it. That knack extended into to all things mechanical and I’ve spent most of my life wishing I could be half as gifted.
    It was a frequent occurrence for people to arrive at our family home with a trailer in tow to drop off mowers and other vehicles for tune-ups and repairs. After casual conversation, dad would unlatch one of the garage door panels and they’d push the contraption de jour into the tiny little shop where he would begin the process of restoration.
    I would visit him in the garage when appropriate. On one such occasion, he was working on a late 1960s style push lawn mower that had a crank on top. Once the crank was fully wound, the operator would lock it in place and flip a switch to ignite the mower. Dad had spent many hours trying to get this mower back into operation, but was having no success. Mom and I visited him in the shop that evening. He was clearly frustrated and I’m sure he spewed a few curse words along the way. As he and mom chatted, I investigated the motor.
    He explained how it was supposed to work, so I started spinning the crank top, listening to it
    click, click, click as it spun. I was soon straining more to get from one click to the next as the tension tightened. “Keep cranking it as far as you can,” dad said with a grin. So I gave it my all. “Let’s see if it starts,” my mom said a bit later. “Go ahead,” dad said. They both looked on with smiles as I pushed the lever into position. In a commotion of smoke and the gurgling sounds of the mower starting up, I looked to my father who was now red-faced
    as mom smiled and laughed in his direction.
    I remember little else about that evening, but I’ll cherish the night I thought I had fixed the one motor dad could not. It’s not the fact that I got one up on my dad. Rather, it’s the fact that he took the time to explain how it worked and allowed me to try. Whether he felt it was a worthwhile effort or not, he gave me a chance. Instead of saying “You’ll never get that thing running, so don’t even try,” he told me to give it a go and encouraged me. It’s similar to when he allowed me to extinguish the barbeque grill coals. He had a great, almost ritualistic process for making the best barbeque chicken you’d ever eaten. That ritual ended by using big grill tongs to pick the still warm coals from the grill and drop them into a bucket of water. It was fun for us kids to listen to the sizzle of hot coals as they hit the cool water, the smell of which lingered in your nose for hours afterward. Dad assigned me the duty on evening. I put on the thick work gloves and did the task. Satisfied with my work, I removed the gloves and put them back onto the shelf directly below the grill. Dad asked me later that night if I had done what he asked. I told him I had and he thanked me. Then he explained that he found the gloves burnt up below the grill. Either a coal dropped from the grill after I had finished, or perhaps during, and I carelessly threw the gloves on top of it.
My dad had the proper response in handling it with me. He was generally known to have a bit of a temper, but that wasn’t the case on this night. Instead, he explained the seriousness of what might have happened and made sure I knew that a much worse situation could have resulted.
No yelling, no cursing, no grounding or spanking. Just an explanation. The crank mower and the grill coals are two of my most cherished memories from my relationship with my dad. They were the rare moments in which we had one-on-one interaction and discussion. They are moments in which he instructed me, made sure I understood and then empowered me to grow as a person.
They are among the reasons I believe parents who take time to be present in their child’s life, to teach them and to equip them for life, are the parents who are most honored by their children. Dad took time to sow some key lessons into my life, and for that I will be forever grateful to him and the wisdom he imparted. I can only hope to weave such solid wisdom and understanding into the lives of my own children.

IMG_9492-e1417104658549-241x300To find out more about Chad Gramling and his books, visit: 1GloriesWriter

Twitter: @1Glories

I would be very grateful if you shared  this article and website on your Twitter, Facebook, or other social media.

Here are some more good reads from Manly Training, and don’t forget that every day until Father’s Day manly training is publishing a new testimony from highly recognized authors, pastors and businessman on what they learned from their dads.

Some more good reads by Manly Training.

What Andy Specht learned from His Dad

What Author Tremayne Moore learned from His Dad

My Dad’s Life Lesson That Really Stuck With Me – Tyler Jacobson

What Kevin P Bradford learned from his dad. – Imitate Me!

Dad’s Sacrifices for Me – Robert P Holland

Fight the Good Fight – Whick D Turner

Time for Catch – Phil Conrad

The Sin of a Father – David Moore

What a father should be like…

BUILD CHARACTER INTO YOUR CHILDREN

ANGER VS. ANNOYANCE (as taught by dad)

What Andy Specht learned from His Dad

chit5ZTGThings I learned from my dad.

When asked this question my first thought was, what did I learn from my dad? It’s not that I didn’t learn anything, it’s that it isn’t something I gave much thought to. It didn’t take long for God to start showing me what I did learn.

In keeping with Ephesians 6:2, “…honor your father”, I’m not going to include of the lesson was good or bad. I believe all lessons have the potential to be good if the knowledge gained is used productively and for good.

First, and most important, was to know God, know His word and know His Son. I remember the impression when I flipped through his Thompson Chain Reference Bible and saw the highlights, underlines and notes. I must of been around 8 or 9 at the time. Since then I have come to agree with Teddy Roosevelt in that a thorough knowledge of the Bible is worth more than a college education. The wisdom and guidance on this one book has set the foundation for many trying times in the future.

He taught me to be involved. Don’t just sit on the side lines complaining. Be a man and do something. Any one can complain. Make a commitment to something.

Serve. There is never an excuse not to serve. Serve God, your wife, your family and your country. The sacrifice of serving is important. It builds character and helps put things in perspective. Nothing builds character and appreciation for what God has given you as being part of something bigger than yourself. When you serve, include your children. They need to see you living the faith you talk about. It also helps them take on their own faith, not living out yours.

Put your spouse first. Men, your wife comes before every other person on earth. Your children will learn this quickly and it will give them a tremendous sense of security. The Bible tells us to leave and cleave, not leave and put her second to your family.

Put in an honest days work. Don’t try and cheat the clock out cut corners. Your faith, the integrity of the gospel and your reputation are on the line. The damaged reputation is not with the short term gain.

Your character matters. Sometimes it’s all you have left. Doing something illegal or immoral at work just to keep the job is not worth it. It’s not worth the affront to God nor the damage to your reputation. Remember, a momentary lapse in judgement can do irreparable harm to the things you profess to stand for.

When you are paid, your tithe and offerings come first. All else is secondary. I’m not going to tell you how much to give, that’s between you and God. I do suggest you and your wife be on the same page. I also recommend reading the story of R.G. LeTourneau. An incredible story of giving and God’s hand in return.

I can give many more lessons, but I return to the most important, know God, know His Son and know His word.

Bio. Andy Specht. Born in Western PA, attended high school in Jamestown, PA before enlisting in the Marine Corps. It was during my time in the Marines that I met my wife who’s from Eastern NC where we reside. I have attended the AG’s School of Ministry and have been in many different aspects of ministry. We have two children. Our oldest graduates high school this spring and is active in the local volunteer fire department. He has been overseas on missions and aspires an internship with Metro Ministries in NYC. Our youngest is passionate about underprivileged children and has her eye on Iris Ministries.

For more about Andy Specht and his work, go to:

Andy Specht – TWITTER

Andy Specht – SOUNDCLOUD

I would be very grateful if you shared  this article and website on your Twitter, Facebook, or other social media.

Here are some more good reads from Manly Training, and don’t forget that every day until Father’s Day manly training is publishing a new testimony from highly recognized authors, pastors and businessman on what they learned from their dads.

Some more good reads by Manly Training.

What Author Tremayne Moore learned from His Dad

My Dad’s Life Lesson That Really Stuck With Me – Tyler Jacobson

What Kevin P Bradford learned from his dad. – Imitate Me!

Dad’s Sacrifices for Me – Robert P Holland

Fight the Good Fight – Whick D Turner

Time for Catch – Phil Conrad

The Sin of a Father – David Moore

What a father should be like…

BUILD CHARACTER INTO YOUR CHILDREN

ANGER VS. ANNOYANCE (as taught by dad)